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? and now, bbc "world news america." washington, from i'm kathy k. the obama administration makes the case, action against the syrian regime. >> the united states government 1429nows that at least syrians were killed in this attack. >> the president himself says he has not made up his mind, and any u.s. response to the chemical attacks will be limited. >> we are not considering any open-ended commitments, any boots on the ground approach. >> saying goodbye to seamus mosty, one of the world's treasured poets, has died at the age of 74. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america, and around the globe. inflicting messages from the obama administration about a possible military -- conflicting messages from the obama administration about a possible military intervention in syria. in muted remarks, the president insisted no decision had been made, and any action would be limited and narrow. is america going to attack the assad regime, and when? mark mardell starts our coverage. in a damascus suburb, witnessed second hand by the whole world is a challenge for america and its presid
this is "bbc world news america." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, giving all profits to charity and pursuing the common good for over 30 years,and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? and now, bbc "world news america." washington, from i'm kathy k. the obama administration makes the case, action against the syrian regime. >> the united states government 1429nows that at least syrians were killed in this attack. >> the president himself says he has not made up his mind, and any u.s. response to the chemical attacks will be limited. >> we are not considering any open-ended commitments, any boots on the ground approach. >> saying goodbye to seamus mosty, one of the world's treasured poets, has died at the age of 74. >> welcome to
at www.america.aljazeera.com. i'm stephanie sy in new york. you're watching al jazeera news. my name is jonathan betz. i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. >>my name is ranjani chakraborty, i'm from houston, texas. >>i'm kim bondy. >>nicole deford. >>and i'm from new orleans. >>san francisco, california. when i was a little kid, i just really loved the news. >>news was always important in my family. >>i knew as a kid that was exactly what i wanted to do. >>i learned to read by reading the newspaper with my great-grandfather every morning. >>and i love being able to tell other people stories. >>this is it, i want to be a part of this. >>this is what really drove me to al jazeera america. there's more to financial news than the ups and downs of the dow. for instance, can fracking change what you pay for water each month? have you thought about how climate change can affect your grocery bill? can rare minerals in china affect your cell phone bill? or how a hospital in texas could drive up your healthcare premium? i'll make the connections from the news to yo
for equality and economic progress and issued a challenge to america -- to live up to its democratic ideals. how does america measure up today? i'll ask our guests, civil rights pioneer and georgia congressman john lewis, mayor of newark, new jersey, cory booker, and develop nor of louisiana, bobby jindal. also, we'll explore the overall state of american dream -- civil rightses, the struggle of the middle classes, issues at the heart of our political debate. our roundtable weighs in. host of msnbc's "politics nation," the reverend al sharpton, pulitzer prize-winning journalist sheryl wudunn, republican congressman from idaho, raul labrador, and unique perspective from historian doris kearns goodwin as well as "new york times" columnist david brooks. i'm david gregory. all that ahead on "meet the press" this sunday, august 25th. good sunday morning. thousands of people gathered here in washington saturday to re-create the march on washington where dr. king gave his famous i have a dream speech. and it was exactly 50 years ago today, august 25th, 1963, that dr. king and the executive secreta
in the past 50 years we have witnessed what i'd like to call the nonviolent revolution in america, a revolution of values, a revolution of ideas, and our country is a better country. >> you know, the president will speak on wednesday in the same spot. he'll mark 50 years since the i have a dream speech. we've talked over the years, and you told me about a year and a half ago in your view a lot of people can't get comfortable with the idea of an african-american president even though what a testament to the progress and the dream that dr. king had. and you even said during your speech yesterday there are forces, there are people who want to take us back. what specifically are you talking about? >> well, i hear people over and over again saying we want to take our country back. take it back where? where are we going? we need to go forward. we've made so much progress. i often think -- when i was growing up, i thought it was science that said white men, colored men, white women, colored women, colored waiting, those signs are gone. when i first came to washington in 1961, the same ye
were killed. those are the headlines at this hour. america tonight is up next. you can get the latest news online at al jazeera.com. i will see you at 11:00 eastern time. >> on america tonight, now it's all in the timing. washington sends its firmest signals yet that it intends to act. >> they are watching. they want to see whether the united states and our friends mean what we say. >> back to school and adding up the risks. chicago students seek safe passage to class. >> it be glasses on the floor and the drugs. you have to walk through all of that danger and it's very carry. >>> also tonight, losing control. a burst of heat threatens to fuel a new round of california wildfires. ♪ >>> and good evening, thanks for being with us, i'm joie chen. while the timing remains a mystery, the white house laid down some clear markers about the actions against syria. both president obama and his chief diplomat, secretary of state john kerry had high confidence that the syrian government used chemical weapons against its own people and set fairly clear guidelines in place about how it intends to
in his book, i try to love america. but i cannot love things. no one in good health can. imagine a world of material wealth is devoid of people. i try to love america and its people, the dominant majority, their depiction of me and their treatment of mine. i have had to try to love america but they would not love the african whole of me. thus i could not love america. i have come to know that i have tried to love america's ideals and promise and process. these things could mean no more to me than they have to those that conceived them were written on were cited and ultimately betrayed them. then i stopped trying to love america. with that has come a measure of unexpected contentment that is settled upon me like an ancient ceremonial robe, warm and splendid, mislead but valued all the more for its belated retrieval. randall robinson, thank you for being with us. >> guest: thank you for having me. >> on this week's newsmakers, dana rohrabacher. he's chairman of the foreign affairs subcommittee on europe, eurasia, and emerging threats. we discussed a variety of foreign policy topics
know, but what we do now. it's a question of american resolve, and america's place in the world. >> our concern with the cause of the defenseless people of syria, is about choices that will directly affect our role in the world and our interests in the world. it is also profoundly about who we are. we are the united states of america. we are the country that has tried not always successfully, but always tried to honor a set of universal values around which we have organized our lives and our aspirations. this crime against conscious, this crime against humanity, this crime against the most fundamental principles of international community, against the norm of the international community, this matters to us. >> and a little while after that, president obama spoke at the white house ahead of a meeting with balkan leaders -- pardon me, baltic leaders. he said there's no open-ended commitments being discussed. there's no american boots on the ground in syria. he did not make a decision but he did express that he wished the international community had already acted and lamented the fact that
is an only in america story and it is an amazing tale of entrepreneurship. you don't want to miss this. >>> then a big question that affects us all, for the first time in history, a majority of human beings now live in cities. what does that mean? more skyscrapers and congestion? more detroit? we'll look at the upsides and the down sides of an ever more urban world. we've got a terrific battle that has some surprising ideas. >>> also, "les miserables." it turns out that the book by victor hugo is the all-time favorite novel of a middle eastern leader that the west counts as an enemy. i will explain. >>> but first, here's my take. we are watching a season of discontent in a world of young democracies, from egypt to turkey to brazil. protest marches and one coup. as we watched the turbulence around the world, i think about our own democratic journey and how interesting it is that the distinctive feature of the american system is not how democratic it is, but rather, how undemocratic it is. hear me out -- we have three co-equal branches of government. and the one with the final say on man
claude mckay, fats waller, duke ellington. america experienced and said, we like the style of these people. they enjoyed it, adopted it, integrated it. and exploited it. the popularity of black style and culture soon spread throughout the country. it was not enough for black folks to be artistically admired. black folks wanted and demanded full participation in the social, political, and economic life of american society. that attitude set the stage for the civil rights movement of the 1950's and 1960's. on wednesday, august 28, 1963, 300,000 people -- 80% of them black -- marched on the nation's capital as did before this lincoln memorial, declaring that the time for radical change had come -- and stood before this lincoln memorial, declaring that the time for radical change had come. celebrating the past is good. but without a vision for the future, we will never move beyond that past. in 2008, america was ready for an intelligent and articulate black man to sit in the oval office. he brought not only his intelligence, but some swagger into the white house. the reality is
syria. >> translator: >> this is part of america's plan to divide the middle east it started with iraq and now syria and this is an israel's interest. tra*p>> translator: it happenedn iraq and maybe in syria and maybe egypt. >> reporter: the syrian government promised to defend themself against attack. the fire in syria won't stop at its borders. al jazeera, beirut. >> the tinspection team in syria could take two weeks to release its report but the u.s. will wait on findings -- will it wait on findings before launching any attack. james is at the u.n. the ambassadors of the five members of the security council on their way to a meeting. this wasn't a formal session along the horseshoe table the final court of international security. the place where historically so many decision about global war and peace have been taken. instead, the last of the arrive at a meeting of the u.s. secretary general with the ambassador of the country will take security council. the weapons inspectors have made good progress taking samples of witness statements inside syria at the sight of the chemical attac
talked to him on the program in depth. this is three hours. >> host: what does america owe blacks? >> guest: well, it owes them an acknowledgment of what happened. we don't like to talk about that in the states. even blast history month. there's a truncated version of what woodson had in mind. now it starts in slavely and moves forward and cuts us all from any access to african history. which was not what woodson intended. and so we obviously owe the value of our hire to those people who suffered so much and their families who dissented from those people who worked for 246 years for nothing. we owe them something for that. we owe them the story. we have been asked to expect that people can survive in good sound, psychology health. ashes and obliterated history. when i was a dmield richmond, virginia, we used to have a phrase that we used all the time from here to tim. but nobody knew what it was. nobody knew the providence of the world. didn't know where it was. didn't know it was a place. tim buck, which was a cross roads. it was also a site of one the world's first university. a
don't seem to be interested. >> welcome, everyone. >> al jazeera america makes its debut. will americans buy what they are selling? if dark clouds are bothering your white house, why not bring in something sunny? >> on the panel this week, writer and fox news contributor judy miller. syndicated columnist cal thompson. jim pinkerton. daily beast columnist kearse ton powers. fox news contributor richard grinnell. "fox news watch" is on right now. >> we can and must be more transparent. so i directed the intelligence community to make public as much information about these programs as possible. all these steps are designed to ensure that the american people can trust their efforts are in line with our interests and our values. to others around the world i want to make clear once again that america is not interested in spying on ordinary people. intelligence is focused, above all, on finding the information that's necessary to protect our people and in many cases protect our allies. >> that was the president earlier this month trying to convince americans his administration i
that the united states of america makes our own decisions on our own time lines based on our values and our interests. now, we know that after a decade of conflict the american people are tired of war. believe me, i am a too. but fatigue does not absolve us of our responsibility. just longing for peace does not necessarily bring it about. history would judge us all extroardinar illy harshly if we turn a blind eye to use of wepons of massa destruction against all common understanding of decen decenty. we know we have a president that will do what he said he will do. whatever decision he makes in syria it will bear no resemblance to iraq, iran or libya. it will not involve boots on the ground and will not be open ended and it will not assume responsibility for civil war that is already well under way. the president has been clear, any actiony he might decide to take will be limited and tailored response to ensure ay despot's brutal and flagrant use of chemical weapon system is held accountable and ultimately we are committed, we remain committed and believe it's the primary objective is to ha
, thank you very much. more news on al jazeera. "america night" is next. >>> two opposeing forces in a deadly struggle for power. ordinary egyptians and journalists call with pressure on the media. are we getting the full picture? >> also tonight, behind bars, the battle over the new orleans prison. who should control it? and who should pay for it? "america tonight" gets rare access to one of the most dangerous prisons in america. >>> and cancers unlikely enemy. how doctors have a cure with another deadly disease. >> she's like what? you're putting polio in my daughtedaughter's brain? are you serious? >>> hello. and welcome to "america tonight". we watch day by day the toll in egypt grow and become more vicious and we wanted to get a clearer sense what it's like for ordinary egyptians that it's tk*e divided after two years of turmoil. we sent and despite threats and attacks and great restrictions on the movements. >> reporter: when we arrived in cairo, the city was on fire. thousands of demonstrators had set the capitol in defiance of the newest -- the muslim brotherhood supporter
for al jazeera america. >>my name is ranjani chakraborty, i'm from houston, texas. >>i'm kim bondy. >>nicole deford. >>and i'm from new orleans. >>san francisco, california. when i was a little kid, i just really loved the news. >>news was always important in my family. >>i knew as a kid that was exactly what i wanted to do. >>i learned to read by reading the newspaper with my great-grandfather every morning. >>and i love being able to tell other people stories. >>this is it, i want to be a part of this. >>this is what really drove me to al jazeera america. >> very much followed one of the two main camps. when they were aligned with the brotherhood and morsi, they kind of towed that line because they were against th. and like she said, they have no problem with a crackdown on the brotherhood by the military. and right now they really don't have leadership that is in the public sphere. they don't have someone who can speak on their behalf. they don't have someone who represents their opinions, and that makes it very difficult for them to really have a voice in decision-making. >> th
say the same? and i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. i started in a small television station in rural arkansas. it's a part of the country that often gets overlooked. but there are a lot of fascinating people there, a lot of fascinating stories there. i like that al jazeera will pay attention to those kinds of places. what drew me to journalism is i like the idea that we are documenting history. al jazeera documents it like none other. and to be a journalist, and to be part of a team like that? that's an incredible blessing. what happens when social media uncovers unheard, fascinating news stories? >>they share it on the stream. >>social media isn't an afterthought. it drives discussion across america. >>al jazeera america social media community, on tv and online. >>this is your outlet for those conversations. >>post, upload, and interact. >>every night, share undiscovered stories. be and let me just show you what 13,000 people living under canvas looks like. they built this from scratch. the camp need clean water, sanitation. there is a lot that
>>> good morning, america. and at this hour, momentum building for an american strike on the syrian armed forces. responsible for the chemical attack. the crucial phone call intercepted between those responsible, as the u.n. asked for more time to get weapon inspectors out. >>> i have a dream. >> 50 years after the march on washington. and one of the most famous speeches ever made, the president returns to the lincoln memorial today, with a renewed call on race equality in america right now. >> free at last. >>> breaking overnight. michael douglas and catherine zeta-jones separate after almost 13 years. insiders reveal the a-listers are taking a break. what's driven one of hollywood's high-wattage couples apart? >>> and meet the new american teen phenom shooting to stardom overnight. her father once trapped under the rubble of a massive earthquake, cheering her on. this morning, victoria duval's cinderella story. >>> and good morning, america. so many developments happening right now. this just in, the first confirmation from the u.n. team in syria. that civilians were attacked by a
of justice flickered. it never died. because they kept marching, america changed. because they marched, the civil rights law was passed. because they marched, the voting rights law was assigned. because they marched, doors of opportunity in education swung open so their daughters and sons could imagine a life for themselves beyond washing someone else's laundry or shining someone else's shoes. because they marched, city councils changed and state legislatures changed and congress changed. eventually the white house changed. [cheers and applause] because they marched, america became more free and more fair. not just for african-americans, but for women and latinos. asians and native americans. catholics, jews, and muslims. for gays, for americans with disabilities. america changed for you and for me. the entire world drew strength from that example, whether it be young people who watched from the other side of an iron curtain and would eventually tear down that wall, or the young people inside south africa would eventually end the scourge of apartheid. [cheers and applause] those are th
. when women succeed, america succeeds. when people of color succeed, america succeeds. he would also want us to be fighting for voting rights. certainly we must pass a bill in the congress to correct what the supreme court did, but we must also be sure that every person who is eligible to vote can vote and that their vote would be counted. when i was here 50 years ago, people said -- and that includes voting rights for the district of columbia. when i was here 50 years ago people say, what do you remember most? and the music is playing, so i'll say this. dr. king said this 50 years ago, the music of the march, the harmony of the civil rights movement, the notes of dr. king's inspirational words must continue to inspire us to compose as dr. king said on that august afternoon a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. are you ready to beat the drum for that beautiful symphony of brotherhood? are you ready to realize the dream? thank you all very much. >> that was representative nancy pelosi. she has represented california's 12th district for more than 25 years. she is, of course, the first w
is a reflection of where america stands right now. according to a reuters poll, only 25% would support a military intervention. 45% oppose it, 49% don't know enough to answer. so dell, what is the objective of any military strike by the u.s.? the u.s. on record for more than a year calling for the assad regime to go but if this were to go forward, the objective would be to suppress the ability to deliver councilmember a call weapons and nothing more. >> you are now in washington and i was there yesterday and one of the things that is curious to the american public is we think all of washington is talking about syria and egypt. the truth of the matter is what they are talking about and i had a feeling yesterday that it was about back-to-school sales? >> yes, if you are going to do something in the rush hour, do it in late day and out of rush hour. the talk on the sunday shows today, largely about syria but also about the martin martin luther king anniversary as well. there doesn't seem to be a lot of focus and the principle point i should make here is congress has been out the last five weeks. the
's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >>> 50 years after martin luther king junior delivered his monumental i have a dream speech, tens of thousands are in washington to commemorate that dream. some worry that the advances are in dangery of being rolled back. >> reporter: the crowds that massed in front of the lincoln mey morial didn't match the 200,000 or more who watched martin luther king at the same spot half a century ago. but their determination to see america redeem his vision was strong, as children they were at the 25th anniversary of the march and brought their own kids to the 50 year commemoration. >> there are a lot of people who still care about equity and justice in the united states and recognize we haven't made it, but we are also fighting for the same cause. >> reporter: the speakers underlined the obstacles that still hindered black
." >> this is bbc world news america, reporting from washington, i am katty kay. says that if his country is attacked he will defend himself. if this happens, what kind of effect may this have? >> the horrific aftermath of an attack carried out allegedly by the syrian government using an incendiary bomb. we have this exclusive report. cuba is back in the ring after banning professional boxing for half a century. the punching is flying once again. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and across the globe. in washington, new york and london, there have been a series of tense meetings on syria. presidentt jet -- obama has briefed john boehner, and david cameron is talking to parliament. russia has called a meeting of the security council. no decision has been made but with a threat looming, president assad says that syria will defend itself. the syrian people are increasingly nervous as we report from damascus. it feels as if something big is coming to damascus. the supporters of president assad paraded on the hotel, outside of the where the u.n. inspectors and foreign c
with the national security council, america's top defense intelligence and cabinet officials meeting with the president in the west wing of the white house. a statement from the white house says they reviewed a range of potential options for the united states and the international community, and they note that the gathered group is mindful of the symptoms that are exhibited on many of those images that we have seen coming out in the wake of that chemical attack. chuck hagel, speaking of those options and the military options in particular has told reporters traveling with him in southeast asia that those option require positioning of our forces to be able to carry out whatever the president ultimately decides and we do know that a navy warship has stayed on longer, bringing a total of five into the eastern mediterranean. >> that's anom nus sign for the syrian regime. the red line has been crossed. the president, his rhetoric has toughened. he has talked about a co are fr being deployed by the assad regime. the goal, should the united states pursue a military option, not to enter on o
the nation. >> what was at stake that day? >> the future of america. >> was dr. king's dream fulfilled? the powerhouse roundtable weighs in on that and all the week's politics. it's all right here this sunday morning. >> from abc news, a special edition of "this week" with martha raddatz in cairo. and jonathan karl in washington. starts right now. >>> good morning, george is off today. we're reporting from a region on the brink, and all eyes are on syria, where an apparent chemical weapons attack could lead to american military action. here in cairo, we're just 100 miles from the mediterranean sea where u.s. warships are now at the ready. this morning, officials tell abc news that u.s. navy destroyers now in the mediterranean could be used to carry out limited military strikes. cruise missile strikes, designed to deter or prevent another chemical attack by the assad regime. if this week's suspected attack is verified. >> this is clearly a big event. of grave concern. that starts getting to some core national interest that the united states has. >> president obama has so far been unwill
commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s. than any other place in the world. in fact, we've invested over $55 billion here in the last five years - making bp america's largest energy investor. our commitment has never been stronger. like carpools... polly wants to know if we can pick her up. yeah, we can make room. yeah. [ male announcer ] ...office space. yes, we're loving this communal seating. it's great. [ male announcer ] the best thing to share? a data plan. at&t mobile share for business. one bucket of data for everyone on the plan, unlimited talk and text on smart phones. now, everyone's in the spirit of sharing. hey, can i borrow your boat this weekend? no. [ male announcer ] share more. save more. at&t mobile share for business. ♪ at&t mobile share for business. every day we're working to and to keep our commitments. and we've made a big commitment to america. bp supports nearly 250,000 jobs here. through all of our energy operations, we invest more in the u.s.
calculations and the reason has to do with not only international norms but also america's core self interest. >> in texas, the fort hood shooter gets the death sentence. nidal hasan, the death sentence now starts an automatic appeals process. on the 50th anniversary of martin luther king jr.'s i have a dream speech, hundreds of thousands gathered at the national mall. >>> fire continues to go into yosemite national park. that's the news at this hour. we'll see you at 11. >> on america tonight, stepping back, faced with the unraveling of national support for the strike on syria will the u.s. president go it alone? >>> and on the anniversary of the march for jobs and justice we consider just how much difference 50 years have made. >> dr. king would ask, to sit at the integrated lunch count if you can't -- counterif you can't afford the meal. >>> the new fight against another vicious intruder. >> this one is a 10.5% alcohol in there. this is what they drink. and good evening, thanks for being with us. i'm joie chen. >>> at the end of a tumultuous day, president obama says if he decides to launc
, but also america's core self interests. >> the army major convicted of killing 13 people at fort hood in texas has been sentenced to die. nadal hassan was sentenced earlier today. that sentence will be automatically appealed. >> on the 50th anniversary of martin luther king's "i have a dream" speech, thousands gathered in washington, d.c. again. former presidents, celebrities and every day americans were there. >> near two weeks, firefighters are till fighting that fire out in california. we'll have the latest news coming up at 11:00 here on aljazeera. ♪ theme ♪ theme >> as the u.s. may be drawing closinger to intervention in syria polls vin to show a large majority of americans oppose military action. how can the u.s. build an international coalition when its leaders can't build one here at home? also, twitter, google and "the new york times" websites suffer cyber attacks. a group connected to the syrian government is the likely culprit. how vulnerable is america's cyber infra structure to another attack. >> the women who worked side by side with the men during the civil movement
of the south asian political dynamic in america. that was my first event at the forum. and those it is right feel most at home here in new york in drew is modest because these books and we have done together starting over one decade ago when we will talk about why the meeting of the world social forum it was a world conference against racism and intolerance and discrimination so why was there such chaos come on the stage of the left? there never seems to be a coherent agenda. we have so many different issues in there and able to fight a united horizon. not a single horizon but some kind of unity but the first time we talk about this i said i would write a book about it be over 100 pages because of durbin was in danger of being forgotten. faugh five all that work that went to put together this major conference was in danger of the loss. i remember we matt and i said i cannot publish his book because it is a book of defeat it does not recognize there is no future for the movement. it is a swan song that never came together. said then went back where is the dynamic? what about in the venues lik
follow developments on www.america.aljazeera.com. >>> there is condemnation after chemical attacks in syria. al jazeera's omar al asalah now reports. >> reporter: a day after hundreds of syrians including women and children were killed or injured. a surge among the dead for missing relatives. a syrian opposition said more than 1,300 people died after government forces used chemical weapons in a number of areas east and west of the capitol damascus. accusationaccusation strongly dy the syrian government. the shocking pictures of the victims have brought swift international condemnation. the french government demanding some sort of action. >> if proven opposition is there needs to be a reaction. what does that mean? not to send soldiers into the field but a reaction of international condemnation, and condemnation, i won't be more precise, of force. >> reporter: and germans hinting at barbaism. >> these reports are series and should they turn out to be true it would be an monstrosity. >> reporter: a meeting at the united nations security council failed to produce the best ponce. secre
jazeera america launched a new and needed voice in journalism. the new york times calls it "serious, straight-forward news". "accurate, responsible" says the washington post. and the baltimore sun says, "instantly engaging and powerful". al jazeera america, there's more to it. make sure that stories don't escape them. >> every day a storm of views. how can you fully understand the impact unless you heard angles you hadn't considered. consider this, antonio mora brings you smart conversation that challenges the status quo. stories that matter to you. saudi arabia for that. ♪ test test .. . .. . but should you be made aware if you are consuming them. that's next on "consider this." welcome back to al jazeera. members of congress are being briefed right now about syria. >> possibly to start the end of this week, about now. now things look so very different. the loyal britt whose have stood by the americans in iraq, and afghanistan will not be onboard, this time. so obama has to decide, i think, whether to go it alone with perhaps the support of the french. and it looks like there
>> this is "bbc world news america." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, giving all profits to charity and pursuing the common good for over 30 years, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their -- work hard to understand the industry that you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and provide capital for key strategic decisions. solutionsxpertise and in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> this is bbc world news america, reporting from washington, i am katty kay. says that if his country is attacked he will defend himself. if this happens, what kind of effect may this have? >> the horrific aftermath of an attack carried out allegedly by the syrian government using an incendiary bomb. we have this exclusive report. cuba is back in the ring after banning professional boxing for half a century. the punching is flying once again. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and across the gl
0's ♪ and chuck hagel says the vote against military intervention in syria will not change america's strategy. hello and welcome, i'm steven in doha and this is al jazeera, coming up, one of the most prominent leader is arrested and they are pulling out from the front line in their battle against the congo army. but first united states is still planning a military response to a suspected gas attack by syrian government forces. it had expected the uk to join a possible coalition but the british parliament voted against any strikes on syria as carolyn malone reports. >> reporter: the resistance outside of the white house against the u.s. attacking syria. and the leaders look at military options and an important ally is against intervening with syria with suspected use of chemical weapons and chuck hagel says the united states still hopes to act with other allies. >> our approach is to continue to find an international coalition that will act together and i think you are seeing a number of countries say publically state their position on the use of chemical weapons. >> reporter:
money real. my name is jonathan betz. i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. >>my name is ranjani chakraborty, i'm from houston, texas. >>i'm kim bondy. >>nicole deford. >>and i'm from new orleans. >>san francisco, california. when i was a little kid, i just really loved the news. >>news was always important in my family. >>i knew as a kid that was exactly what i wanted to do. >>i learned to read by reading the newspaper with my great-grandfather every morning. >>and i love being able to tell other people stories. >>this is it, i want to be a part of this. >>this is what really drove me to al jazeera america. what happens when social media uncovers unheard, fascinating news stories? it drives discussion across america. share your story on tv and online. >> welcome back. these are our top stories at this hour. syrian rebels are accusing the government of launching a nerve gas attack they say killed hundreds, including children. the alleged attack comes hours after a team of u.n. weapons experts arrived in damascus to investigate previous attacks. >> bradley ma
is elected with the duty to protect the national security interest of the united states of america and the decision he makes about the decisions that he makes about our foreign policy is with our national security interest front and center. >> now, the white house national security staff put out a statement this evening saying the president will continue to consult with u.s. allies but there is no mention the u.s. will go along with international partners. the next step comes when administration releases it's intelligence report on the chemical weapons attack to the public. the white house has hinted the president may make another statement on syria and presumably a window for action opens up this weekend when u.n. inspectors are scheduled to leave syria, but the u.s. appears to be ready to move before any further action at the ump u.n. they want to send a signal not just to syria but the world about the use of chemical weapons, piers. >> thanks very much, indeed. joining me now is senator john mccain. senator, thank you for joining me. why are you so credit kill of the president's
africa, central and latin america and a majority of asia and discusses the possibilities for an alternative system to emerge. this is about two hours. >> okay. thank you, max. thanks to the brecht forum for hosting us, thanks to all of you for coming out. i am andy, i'm an editor at verso books, and we are the proud publishers of vijay's new book, "poorer nations." i'm going to just briefly introduce vijay. he's going to talk about his book for a bit, then we're going to have a q&a. i'll kick it off with a few questions, then we're going to turn it over to you. and as max said, we have to -- we're hoping to, you know, wait for the mic to get to you, and this is going to be recorded, it'll play on booktv on c-span at some point in the future, which is exciting. i get the feeling that a lot of people here know vijay, but just for those who don't, a little bit of bio about vijay prashad. vijay is the edward saed chair, very appropriate, at the american university of beirut right now. he was formerly and for a long time the george and martha kellner chair of south asian studi
people. also white people, and to know that a nation such as america and the reason that i struggle with it so hard and i grapple with it so hard is because i really believe in the potential of this country. and this country has not realized its potential, it has not even begun to scratch the surface and the humanities. and because i do feel strongly about that potential and because of the kind of inheritance i've had, it was necessary for may to be this. >> and we are very happy to have harry belafonte joining us now on the program today from new york. mr. belafonte, looking back, what do you think about the promise of dr. king's dream, of everything you worked for? what has been achieved? what still need to bes to be ac? >> i do believe that that moment was filled with dreams of over two centuries of expectation that came from the african-american community. and a big part of the american community. we have enjoyed a great journey in achieving the victories that we did. now today i think that we are under a great threat of having those victories reversed. i think there's a new con
presence in least, in latin america, and venezuela, in the united states some have been caught smoking across the bord border. maybe doing some things again u.s. interest, other places in the world those present bigger problems for us we try to protect not only military and diplomatic interests but commercial interests has. >> thank you so much colonel bill cowen. >> thank you, lori. >> we'll have more on obama administration handling of conflict in syria later with our a team. >> on a historic anniversary, first black president shares his dream of equality in america. analyzing president obama's speech, and state of race relations in america next. lori: on wall street stocks rebounding after two days of losses, dow closed with a gain the 48, and nazdaq rose 15. 2. 7 billion shares traded hands today. precious metal, gold falling $140 an ounce after a run -- $ 1.40 an ounce after yesterday's run-up, crude oil settles just botcabove $110 a barrel. check bond market, shield on 10-year note 2.78%. falling yesterday in the safe a half know play. it is a historic day in washington, presiden
>>> good morning, america. this morning, inside the fire zone. we're on the front lines of the all-out battle to contain the giant wildfire raging in yosemite national park. how this fire is creatings it own weather and now jeopardizing rows of giant sequoias, the symbols of the park system. >>. ♪ when will i hide below >> a singer silenced as linda ronstadt says she has parkensons. why she can no longer sing, and why it took eight years to diagnose nose. >> cry for help, a boy hearing robbers breaking in and alls 911. >> i'm going to have to whisper because they are coming here. >> what the dispatcher told him to do next. >>> and the running of the bulls comes to america. this morning, the backlash and the thousands of adrenaline junkies in virginia who decided to go for it anyway. >> good morning, america! >> from abc news, live from new york, this is "good morning america" with dan harris and bianna golodryga. >> good morning on this very busy sunday. we want to get to the top story this morning, the wildfire raging into yosemite national park. >> morning, it's threatening hom
news at www.aljazeera.com [♪ music ] >> on america tonight. >> nothing today is more serious, and nothing is receiving more serious scrutiny. >> sharp words from washington leave little doubt what the u.s. thinks happened to these syrian victims. now focus turns to how and when the world will respond. >>> and the threat to california's most mighty residents. the enormous blazes that have also triggered fears for san francisco's water supply. also tonight we're keeping up the fight for chicago. a community left in a constant state of mourning and wondering how will the violence ever end? >> i'm so tired of doing funerals of young men getting killed through gun violence whether by th the police or anor gang. it just wears you down. [♪ music ] >> good evening, and welcome to america tonight. i'm ow joie chen. we start with a high stakes for the united states and the international community. it was these picture, gruesome, grizzly images, hundreds of men, women and children fell by something a week ago that has led increased pressure on damascus to explain and the european capi
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